In 1956, the Rosenbluths moved to San Diego, where Marshall Rosenbluth took up a position at General Atomics, a division of General Dynamics established to study the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Their marriage ended in divorce in 1978.

Among the survivors of Dr. In addition to her daughter Jean and her son Alan, Rosenbluth has two other daughters, Robin and Mary; five grandchildren; a bootleg; and two great-grandchildren.

After Los Alamos, Arianna Rosenbluth no longer worked professionally, but concentrated on raising her children.

“This was someone at the start of an extraordinary career who at the time was truly beyond the weight of anyone,” said Benjamin Pope, a computational astrophysicist and senior lecturer at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.

“So she makes a serious contribution to statistical physics and has never heard of it again,” said Dr. Pope who runs a Wikipedia page about Dr. Rosenbluth created. “And today you couldn’t throw a stone in the street in Palo Alto or Berkeley without finding someone to run MCMC,” he added, referring to the technology-rich cities of California.

Nevertheless, Dr. Rosenbluth preserved her love for science.

“As I grew up, I remember her constantly working out equations just for her own mental exercise,” said her daughter Jean, a federal judge in Los Angeles. Alan Rosenbluth said his mother did independent research in knot theory, a branch of mathematics.

Andrew Gelman, statistician and political scientist at Columbia University, pointed out that many applications today use an algorithm called Stan, which is based on a variant of the Metropolis algorithm. Dr. Gelman and his colleagues named the program after Stanislaw Ulam, a co-developer of the Monte Carlo methods.

“Maybe we should have called it Arianna,” he said.