Capuchin monkeys are small, playful, and smelly. They “soak their hands and feet in urine to create an odor,” according to the World Wildlife Federation. You are smart too. Researchers have said that the capuchin monkeys have a certain level of intelligence and intelligently select effective tools to help them break open palm nuts to eat.

After the money was deposited into Mr. Hammond’s bank account, two people reportedly had the animal transported first to Nevada, then to California. The animal was delivered to the buyer in October 2017, and police officers confiscated the animal from that buyer in January 2018, the indictment said. A month later, Mr. Hammond informed police officers that he had sold the animal to a person in Nevada who is charged with allowing monkeys.

In March 2016, according to the indictment, Mr Hammond sold a cotton tamarin – a small primate that the federal government is designating as critically endangered – to a person in Wisconsin. In April 2017, he sold another to a person in Alabama; and in October he sold two cotton tamarins to a person in South Carolina, the prosecution said.

Cotton tamarins are one of the smallest primates in the world. Although small, they are “big in hair and loud” with a “shock of white fur” around their skulls in what appears to be an “Einsteinian Mohawk,” as an article in the New York Times once described. The article playfully referred to them as “punks among monkeys” and said that they “make beautiful punk music, squeak, whistle, chirp, let go with cutting screams”.

In August 2020, Mr. Hammond tried to convince one of his customers to do so Mistakenly tell law enforcement officers that the indictment states that she bought Tamarine at a flea market and not from Mr. Hammond.

According to prosecutors, that customer bought the animals from Mr Hammond and later returned them to him “with the intent of preventing officials from delaying and preventing” from learning of the transaction.