The FBI Found 48 Empty Classified Folders At Mar-a-Lago

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In a sign that there may be classified documents out in the wild, the FBI found 48 empty classified folders in Trump’s possession.

Peter Strzok tweeted:

In all, 48 EMPTY folders labeled as containing classified information 🧐https://t.co/BFIilDHz0P pic.twitter.com/6z8wjUnZv3

— Peter Strzok (@petestrzok) September 2, 2022

Highlights one issue of appointing a Special Master: the seized material provides reasonable inference there still may be classified info in the wild – and you can’t effectively investigate without the docs.

A delay in investigating represents a risk to national security.

— Peter Strzok (@petestrzok) September 2, 2022

Minus Strzok’s joke plug of his book, he highlights the worst-case scenario for national security. It would be awful to know that Trump gave or sold secrets to a foreign country, but what is even worse is having the documents missing with no idea where they may have gone or who has them.

If the DOJ knows that document X is in possession of nation Y, they can take steps to try to protect sources and methods. However, having no idea where the classified documents could be means that the country is vulnerable and can’t take the necessary steps to defend itself.

It is unimaginable that a judge could appoint a special master to oversee the documents when all of the documents have not been accounted for.

Trump has harmed the national security of the nation, and he should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

Mr. Easley is the managing editor. He is also a White House Press Pool and a Congressional correspondent for PoliticusUSA. Jason has a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science. His graduate work focused on public policy, with a specialization in social reform movements.

Awards and  Professional Memberships

Member of the Society of Professional Journalists and The American Political Science Association